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  • Luxembourg now has only one landfill for non-hazardous waste intended for the disposal of household, bulky and similar waste.

  • Biowaste consists of biodegradable garden or park waste, food or kitchen waste from households, restaurants, caterers or retail stores, as well as comparable waste from food processing plants. Biowaste with a high water content, especially kitchen waste or food industry waste, is best suited for anaerobic digestion. The treatment of organic waste in anaerobic digestion plants makes it possible to produce biogas as well as a residue that can be used as a soil amendment.

  • Biowaste consists of biodegradable garden or park waste, food or kitchen waste from households, restaurants, caterers or retail stores, as well as comparable waste from food processing plants. Drier waste such as garden and park waste is best suited for composting. In composting facilities, organic waste is transformed by aerobic degradation into a product (compost) which can be used as a soil amendment.

  • The Grand-Ducal Regulation of 1 December 1993 lays down provisions concerning the development and management of container parks for the selective collection of various fractions of household, bulky or similar waste. According to this regulation, a "container park" means any public place where several specific containers are installed for the separate collection of several categories of household, bulky or similar waste. Under the same regulation, municipalities are required either to set up one or more container parks on their territory or to install other separate collection systems for the same waste. The map shows the network of recycling centres for 2016.

  • The relatively quiet urban oases include public green areas and open spaces with a high quality of living space and an appropriate design as compensation areas within walking distance of residential and work locations. Due to their inner-city location, they do not, or do not completely, meet the above-mentioned criteria of a quiet area, e. g. by showing an increased noise level or being significantly lower. However, the urban planning context of the areas has noise-reducing properties, which lead to the fact that the urban oases in their core areas are considerably calmer than their surroundings. These areas make it possible, for example, to take short walks for those seeking peace and quietness in the immediate vicinity of their homes or workplaces.

  • The quiet areas in rural areas include large, cohesive and intact open spaces of supraregional importance with a high recreational function and corresponding development for leisure and recreation. These spacious areas allow for example extensive walks without crossing noisy areas.

  • The quiet urban landscape areas include relatively large, continuous open spaces of at least regional importance with a high recreational function and corresponding development for leisure and recreation. Its importance lies in the balancing function to the noisy and densely populated areas of the agglomeration of Luxembourg. The quiet urban landscape close to the residential area allows, for example, extensive walks with only occasional crossing of areas with higher noise levels.